PEO EIS Programs



Around EIS

LMP Welcomes Lieutenant Colonel Michael N. Parent as its Product Manager

By Ms. Christine Irving (LMP)

On 28 June 2017, PM AESIP COL Harry Culclasure (center) hosted the LMP Change of Charter at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ where LTC Michael N. Parent (right) assumed the LMP Charter from LTC Robert M. Williams (left).
Erin Usawicz, Picatinny Arsenal Photographic Services
On 28 June 2017, PM AESIP COL Harry Culclasure (center) hosted the LMP Change of Charter at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ where LTC Michael N. Parent (right) assumed the LMP Charter from LTC Robert M. Williams (left).

On June 28, 2017, Colonel Harry R. Culclasure, Project Manager, Army Enterprise Systems Integration Program (AESIP), hosted the Logistics Modernization Program (LMP) Change of Charter Ceremony at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ. In attendance were Mr. Nathan Godwin, Army Materiel Command (AMC) Deputy G-3/4 Operations & Logistics; Brigadier General Patrick Burden, Program Executive Officer for Enterprise Information Systems (PEO EIS); Brigadier General Alfred F. Abramson III, Commanding General, Picatinny Arsenal; Mr. Anthony J. Sebasto, Executive Director, Enterprise and System Integration Center; U.S. Army Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center; and guests from AMC, Communications-Electronics Command, the AESIP Project Management Office, and the LMP Product Management Office. During the ceremony, Colonel Culclasure transitioned the LMP charter from Lieutenant Colonel Robert M. Williams to Lieutenant Colonel Michael N. Parent.

"Command is among the most important elements of our Army's organization and how we support Soldiers every day," said Colonel Culclasure during the ceremony. "No function is more meaningful. No position is more robust." Lieutenant Colonel Parent will now lead the LMP as it enters its next chapter in Defense Information Systems Agency migration, fulfilling financial auditability requirements, sustainment modernization work efforts, and planning future work with AMC. Lieutenant Colonel Parent joins the LMP from the Defense Logistics Agency and brings with him experience as both an Armor Officer, Supply and Services Officer, as well as serving as a member of the Army Acquisition Corps.

In his closing remarks, Colonel Culclasure shared his well wishes for Lieutenant Colonel Williams and his wife on his next journey at the Dwight D. Eisenhower School of National Security. Colonel Culclasure also expressed his confidence in Lieutenant Colonel Parent, knowing he will make the LMP his own and that he "will quickly see how special this program and team are." Congratulations Lieutenant Colonel Parent and we welcome you and your family to the PEO EIS family.

Posted July 14, 2017

I3MP delivers 1st Infantry Division HSMCC tech refresh

By Mr. Scott Sundsvold

While the 1st Infantry Division (ID) was deployed to Iraq in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, the Installation Information Infrastructure Modernization Program (I3MP) performed a technology refresh on the 1st ID Command Center at Fort Riley, Kansas, as part of the Home Station Mission Command Center (HSMCC) initiative.

As the Army prepares to operate in a contested, multidomain arena that combines land, air, sea, space and cyber, the HSMCC initiative takes an evolutionary approach to providing joint command centers with the capability to host and operate mission command systems while at home station. The HSMCC technology refresh, the initiative’s first phase, standardizes the disparate, off-the-shelf technology at division and corps headquarters with the standard, bottom-line capability set required to support mission command systems. The HSMCC technology refresh delivers a complete, integrated package of networking equipment and functional software to support multiple combat formations from a command center at home station to the dismounted Soldier in the field.

“In the information age, network readiness enables Army readiness, the Army’s No. 1 priority,” said Brendan Burke, I3MP product manager. “Network readiness in a complex world requires an integrated, secure, uninterrupted network that allows our Army to remain agile. As such, the HSMCC tech refresh delivers the mission-critical IT [information technology] solutions to keep the Army’s fighting edge as agile and expeditionary as possible.”

To prepare for future engagements, the Army network is adapting to meet the business and expeditionary mission command needs of the joint force commanders across the full range of military operations in a joint, inter-organizational, multinational partner environment. The HSMCC will enable units to execute warfighting functions to support geographically dispersed subordinate units.

“The HSMCC tech refresh provides the required architecture, infrastructure, technology and processes to retain our technological overmatch against current and future adversaries,” said Maj. Aleyzer Mora, I3MP assistant product manager for command centers, who managed the day-to-day activities of the 1st ID tech refresh.

The future of Army mission command promises autonomous, self-learning technologies that will anticipate commander’s intent and aid in the military decision-making process. Robotics and artificial intelligence (AI) offer new dimensions of survivability and lethality. By automating routine, time-consuming tasks, commanders and their staffs can focus on high-value, strategic initiatives. Through automation, AI can speed up information-gathering and maximize the quality and accuracy of gathered data to support timely decisions.

The HSMCC tech refresh lays the foundations for commanders to seamlessly share a common operating picture with their staffs and Soldiers, no matter their location. Whether “X marks the spot” with a global positioning system or a virtual location on a cyber battlefield, the Army will have the network capability and capacity to operate the required mission command systems and quickly share vital data with mission partners anywhere at any time.

“On today’s fast-moving and complex battlefield, commanders must be able to communicate their intent to geographically dispersed forces,” said Mora. “HSMCC enables commanders to communicate their intent and share detailed information with Soldiers in the fight. While commanders and their Soldiers may not be standing on the same terrain, they are in the same fight together.”

Mora was assisted by Sarah Mullins, I3MP deputy assistant product manager for command centers, and Thomas “Karl” Brenstuhl, project team assist, in handling the tech refresh. The 1st ID deployed in November 2016, and the installation at Fort Riley took place in May and June 2017.

The rapid delivery of the mission-critical IT solution was made possible by the strong support and coordination between 1st ID, I3MP and its industry partners from Net-Centric Enterprise Solutions Associates. “Mission command is more than a buzzword,” said Mullins. “The HSMCC tech refresh improves readiness by enabling Army leaders to implement mission command, empowering agile and adaptive Soldiers on the battlefield to win.”

Posted July 14, 2017

Computer Hardware Enterprise Software and Solutions is the Army's designated Primary Source for commercial IT Minitab ELA Awarded

By CHESS Public Affairs Office


FORT BELVOIR, VA, July 12, 2017 - Army Computer Hardware, Enterprise Software and Solutions (CHESS) in coordination with the Army Contracting Command – Rock Island (ACC-RI) awards the Minitab Enterprise License Agreement (ELA), a $2.8 million firm- fixed-price ELA (Delivery Order) executed against the Navy’s Enterprise Software Initiative Blanket Purchase Agreement N00104-08-A-ZF30, July 12, 2017. The Minitab ELA provides Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) Lean Six Sigma annual Subscription software licenses, media, training, technical services, and maintenance for Minitab Statistical Software.

"Minitab software has been a critical component of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) projects across the Army for years. The combined team of CHESS, Army Contracting Command - Rock Island, and Minitab did a great job in putting this agreement together. It will allow Army customers to continue meeting LSS goals which ultimately contribute to making the Army run more efficiently and effectively." Said Mr. Doug Haskin, Product Lead for CHESS.

The period of performance is one 12-month base period and four 12-month option periods. Ordering will be open to the Army, Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) and authorized Government contractors supporting these agencies. This contract supports the Continental United States (CONUS) and the Outside Contiguous United States (OCONUS) efforts.

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About CHESS

Based at Fort Belvoir, VA., CHESS reports to the Program Executive Office, Enterprise Information Systems (PEO EIS). Charged by the CIO/G-6 and mandated through Army Regulation 25-1, CHESS is the Army-designated primary source for providing commercial hardware and software solutions for the Army's IT requirements. Offering simple, straightforward contract vehicles through its online Army e-commerce ordering system, the IT e-mart, CHESS directly supports the CIO/G-6 strategy by providing the benefits of continuous vendor competition for best value and consolidating requirements to maximize cost avoidance and leverage the Army's buying power. CHESS works diligently with other Army Knowledge Management partners, including the U.S. Army CIO/G-6, Information Systems Engineering Command, and Network Enterprise Technology Command to provide architecturally sound, standards-and-policy-compliant IT enterprise solutions to all Army customers around the world. For more information about CHESS, visit https://chess.army.mil/.

Posted July 12, 2017

GFEBS stands up GFEBS DEV MOD program

By Ms. Pamella Gray, GFEBS Public Affairs

Mr. Daniel Kitts accepts the Charter for GFEBS DEV MOD from COL Matt Russell, PM GFEBS, in a ceremony held June 15.
Mr. Daniel Kitts accepts the Charter for GFEBS DEV MOD from COL Matt Russell, PM GFEBS, in a ceremony held June 15.

The Program Manager General Fund Enterprise Business System (GFEBS) hosted an Assumption of Charter ceremony June 15 welcoming Daniel Kitts, the new Product Director GFEBS Development and Modernization (DEV MOD).

With the new program, GFEBS continues to evolve to meet the Army's financial management needs and provide an auditable business solution.

“GFEBS DEV/MOD is the baseline for GFEBS,” said COL Matt Russell, GFEBS project manager, in his remarks at the ceremony. “Dan, you will own the baseline and all changes to it. All things center around your program, and the standards and processes you implement will drive much of what we do across the GFEBS portfolio.”

GFEBS DEV MOD will allow for an agile approach in developing and deploying new capabilities and fixes to the system by consolidating sustainment, modernization, and new development in one product team and reducing redundancy, while simultaneously increasing the pace of product improvements.

Russell stressed the importance of this position: “Establishment of a Board Select program is the Army’s recognition of the importance of this position and of the mission. It is recognition that we want a certain quality of leader to run this product.”

“GFEBS must continue to improve the efficiency of the Army and Department of Defense so that operational folks can be more effective,” said Kitts, in his acceptance remarks. “The result must be timelier and better data-driven decisions for resource allocation.” Kitts said that he looks forward to the challenge and the work ahead.

For more information about GFEBS, please visit:
http://www.eis.army.mil/programs/gfebs
http://www.gfebs.army.mil/

Posted July 11, 2017

ADMC-2 Designated 1 of 4 Best in Class IT Contracts for Federal Government

By CHESS Public Affairs


Army Computer Hardware, Enterprise Software and Solutions (CHESS) is pleased to announce the designation of Army Desktop and Mobile Computing – 2 (ADMC-2) as a “Best in Class” (BIC) IT contract by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The BIC-designated IT contracts represent preferred government-wide solutions and provide a unique opportunity to leverage the government’s buying power. The BIC designation allows acquisition experts to take advantage of pre-vetted, government-wide contract solutions; supports a government-wide migration to solutions that are mature and market-proven; assists in the optimization of spend, within the government-wide category management framework; and increases the transactional data available for agency level and government-wide analysis of buying behavior. The BIC designation will also extend to the ADMC-3 contract when it is awarded later this year.

ADMC-2 provides indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity contract vehicles specifically designed as the primary source for information technology equipment to integrate, support, modernize and refresh the Army’s net-centric architecture while providing standardized interfaces. ADMC-2 includes standard common configurations of laptops and desktops (as well as tablets, monitors, printers, ruggedized and semi-ruggedized devices) that meet Army requirements and Government-wide Strategic Solutions standard configurations.

ADMC-2 vendors: Telos, Dell Federal Systems, CDW-G, HPI Federal, ITG, Transource, Emtec Federal and NCS

The program maximum is $5.5 billion across all of the contracts including options and ordering is open to, Army, DoD and other Federal Agencies. There is no fee to place orders against the ADMC-2 contracts.

All desktop and/or notebook computers must be purchased through CHESS during the Consolidated Buy (CB) periods. CHESS implemented the extremely cost-effective CB process in direct support of the Chief Information Officer (CIO)/G-6 strategy for leveraging the Army’s buying power in acquiring commercial off-the-shelf computer technology. Twice a year (January-March and June-September), CHESS’ eight ADMC-2 hardware vendors provide greatly reduced discounts in addition to already low pre-negotiated prices for desktop and notebook computers.

About CHESS

Based at Fort Belvoir, Virginia, CHESS reports to the Program Executive Office Enterprise Information Systems (PEO EIS). Charged by the CIO/G-6 and mandated through Army Regulation 25-1, CHESS is the Army-designated primary source for providing commercial hardware and software solutions for the Army's IT requirements. Offering simple, straightforward contract vehicles through its online Army e-commerce ordering system, the IT e-mart, CHESS directly supports the CIO/G-6 strategy by providing the benefits of continuous vendor competition for best value and consolidating requirements to maximize cost avoidance and leverage the Army's buying power. CHESS works diligently with other Army knowledge management partners, including the CIO/G-6, Information Systems Engineering Command and Network Enterprise Technology Command to provide architecturally sound, standards-and-policy-compliant IT enterprise solutions to all Army customers around the world. For more information about CHESS, visit https://chess.army.mil/.

Posted May 04, 2017

USFK celebrate new VTC installations

By Sgt. Samantha Stoffregen, 1st Signal Brigade Public Affairs

(left to right) Col. Douglas Mellars, United States Forces Korea J6 Strategic Command Center proponent, Col. Robert S. White, USFK J33 Strategic Command Center user, and Lt. Col. Gregory Soulé, Strategic Command Center project provider, cut a ceremonial ribbon signifying the completion of this stage in the life cycle replacement project during a ceremony March 29, 2017 at Command Center Seoul on U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan. The ceremony followed the installation of two high definition command display systems at USAG Yongsan and Camp Tango. (Photo by Cpl. Yoon Sang Park, 1st Signal Brigade Public Affairs)
(left to right) Col. Douglas Mellars, United States Forces Korea J6 Strategic Command Center proponent, Col. Robert S. White, USFK J33 Strategic Command Center user, and Lt. Col. Gregory Soulé, Strategic Command Center project provider, cut a ceremonial ribbon signifying the completion of this stage in the life cycle replacement project during a ceremony March 29, 2017 at Command Center Seoul on U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan. The ceremony followed the installation of two high definition command display systems at USAG Yongsan and Camp Tango. (Photo by Cpl. Yoon Sang Park, 1st Signal Brigade Public Affairs)

U.S. ARMY GARRISON YONGSAN, South Korea – April 3, 2017 –The United States Forces Korea (USFK) celebrated the installation of two high definition command display systems during a ribbon cutting ceremony March 29, 2017 at Command Center Seoul on U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan.

The Product Director Installation, Information, Infrastructure, Communications and Capabilities – Pacific (PD I3C2 – Pacific) United States Forces Korea Strategic Command Center (SCC) video teleconferencing (VTC) hub and Commander’s Information Display Systems (CIDS) project installation kicked off in September 2015. The project provided life cycle replacement for VTC hubs, CIDS at the Commander’s Battle Staff (CBS) room at USAG Yongsan and the Combatant Command (COCOM) room at Camp TANGO.

“A project like this takes a lot of teamwork to accomplish,” said Lt. Col. Gregory Soulé, P2E Product Manager. “That team includes USFK J6 team for planning the life cycle replacement requirement and engagement through the install and the 1st Signal Brigade for logistics and configuration support to installation. We also want to thank the USFK J33 staff for their systems operability guidance and allowing our integrators to work in between their battle rhythm.”

The CIDS installation at USAG Yongsan provides rapid transition between unclassified, secret, and coalition network teleconferences. It also replaced failing, low resolution, video projectors with 18 hi-resolution, light emitting diode monitors with multiple user configurable image sizes. The COCOM room at Camp Tango is a comparable configuration with one third the display size and emphasizes secret network connections and displays.

Soulé said USFK now has a system capable of displaying 30 to 50 different images or sources.

“The current system is entirely digital with a state of the art control board,” Soulé said. “Your conference room operators are capable of safely transitioning through unclassified to CENTRIXS-K, and SIPR VTCs faster than they can sanitize the room participants.”

Col. Douglas Mellars, USFK J6, participated in the ribbon cutting ceremony and thanked P2E as the proponent for the life cycle replacement.

Mellars said P2E delivered a valuable capability which is used almost every day. He added senior USFK leadership was aware of the upgrade in capability and he appreciated the delivery of a usable toolset.

Mellars, Soulé, and Col. Robert S. White, USFK J33, cut the ceremonial ribbon during the ceremony, marking the completion for this stage of the project.

“We’re proud of the work that was accomplished here and we think this will meet your current and future requirements for the next five years and beyond,” Soulé said. “We greatly appreciate the USFK staff and U.S. Army Communications Information Systems Activity, Pacific (USACISA-P) staff who worked so hard with us and our integrator to make this installation possible.”

Posted April 18, 2017

GCSS-ARMY MOVES TO FORT LEE

By MR. JIM MCDONOUGH, SUPPORT OPERATIONS BRANCH LEAD, GCSS-ARMY

Feldman Hall at Fort Lee, Virginia, is the new home of
the GCSS-Army team. (Photo courtesy of Ms. Sherrell
Satterthwaite, Graphic Designer, GCSS-Army)
Feldman Hall at Fort Lee, Virginia, is the new home of the GCSS-Army team. (Photo courtesy of Ms. Sherrell Satterthwaite, Graphic Designer, GCSS-Army)

Global Combat Support System–Army (GCSS-Army) Increment 1 moved to its permanent office facility on Fort Lee, Virginia, on March 16. This move comes nine years after occupying a temporary headquarters in Petersburg, Virginia. The newly renovated Feldman Hall is named for MG Herman Feldman, who served as the Army’s Quartermaster General from March 1949 to September 1951. Formerly a billeting facility for unaccompanied personnel at Fort Lee, Feldman Hall has been transformed into a modern headquarters that greatly enhances the capabilities of the GCSS-Army team. The new building also creates adequate space for the future of the program.

The move to Fort Lee is the result of a project that began nearly three years ago. Anticipating the need for more space as a result of Increment 1, Wave 2 fielding efforts, the team responsible for facility management began the process to expand the program’s footprint in the leased facility in the spring of 2014. The Fort Lee director of public works offered a potential permanent solution at Feldman Hall and the GCSS-Army team, in coordination with the space management team at PEO EIS, initiated the process of evaluating the potential of occupying the building. The business case analysis indicated substantial cost avoidances for the government and improved security for the GCSS-Army workforce. Additionally, Feldman Hall’s proximity to the U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command’s headquarters building, where the Combat Development Team for GCSS-Army is located, was an additional perk for this project.

After a feasibility study and structural analysis confirmed the viability of the project, the design phase started in November 2014. In August 2015, the final design confirmed the continued viability of the project and the renovation contract award took place in September 2015. Renovation took place from January to December 2016 and, after the Fort Lee Network Enterprise Center completed communications installation in early February 2017, the GCSS-Army team move took place.

By restoring an existing building that would otherwise have been demolished, the Feldman Hall project is an example of good stewardship of taxpayer dollars that also aids in the accomplishment of the GCSS-Army mission today and into the future.

Posted April 14, 2017

AMIS SUPPORT TO EUROPEAN ACTIVITY SET

By AMIS COMMUNICATION/OPERATIONS TEAM

Tactical Vehicles with RFID tags attached at EAS-Mannheim. (Photo by Charles Soodavar, AMIS/RF-ITV II contractor)
Tactical Vehicles with RFID tags attached at EAS-Mannheim. (Photo by Charles Soodavar, AMIS/RF-ITV II contractor)

In Europe, Automated Movement and Identification Solutions (AMIS) provides support to U.S. Army Europe (USAREUR) for Operations Atlantic Resolve and European Activity Set.

What is Atlantic Resolve?

Atlantic Resolve is a demonstration of continued U.S. commitment to collective security through a series of actions designed to reassure North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) allies and partners of America’s dedication to enduring peace and stability in the region. Since April 2014, USAREUR has led land forces efforts on behalf of the U.S. military by conducting continuous, enhanced multinational training and security cooperation activities with allies and partners in Eastern Europe. These multinational training and security cooperation activities are taking place in Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Bulgaria and Hungary. The training events improve interoperability, strengthen relationships and trust among allied armies, contribute to regional stability and demonstrate U.S. commitment to NATO.

What is European Activity Set?

In fiscal year 2017, the European Reassurance Initiative is funded at $3.4 billion, most of which will be earmarked for Army operations to reassure allies. With only about 30,000 Soldiers in Europe to counter Russia’s actions today compared to roughly 300,000 against the Soviet Union in the Cold War days, the additions next year will allow the region to be more prepared. “That’s how we make 30,000 look like 300,000,” said LTG Frederick Benjamin “Ben” Hodges, commanding general, USAREUR. “We are an economy of force, but the Army is going to spend a ton of money helping us get that capability back over in Europe.”

USAREUR has identified locations in Europe as European Activity Set and Army Prepositioned Stock – 2 sites, which are strategically prepositioned vital stocks in Europe that reduce the deployment response times of the modular, expeditionary Army. AMIS will provide Radio Frequency In-Transit Visibility (RF-ITV) tracking in support of this initiative. The four locations have been identified for RFITV implementation are Mannheim, Germany; Dulmen, Germany; Eygelshoven, Netherlands and Zutendaal, Belgium. Currently, five Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) read nodes have been installed between Mannheim and Eygelshoven and site surveys have been completed in Dulmen and Zutendaal. Since installation, these five nodes have read nearly 5,000 tags. AMIS contract support engineers and USAREUR G4 continue to provided exceptional support to this very important mission.

Posted April 14, 2017

Computer Hardware Enterprise Software and Solutions is the Army's designated Primary Source for commercial IT

By CHESS Support Team

FORT BELVOIR, VA, March 30, 2017 - Army Computer Hardware, Enterprise Software and Solutions (CHESS) in coordination with the Army Contracting Command – Rock Island (ACC-RI) awarded a ceiling increase for Information Technology Services - Small Business (ITS-SB), an $800 million firm-fixed-price contract, Mar. 23, 2017. The ITS-SB ceiling has increased from $400 million to $800 million, allowing Army, DoD, and Federal customers uninterrupted access to nine small businesses supporting critical Army missions. The contract period of performance remains unchanged, with ordering period date of 13 April 2018, and all work required to be completed by 13 Apr 2020.

The ITS-SB Contract covers a full range of services and solutions necessary for the Army to satisfy its support of the Army enterprise infrastructure and infostructure goals with information technology (IT) services within CONUS.

The ceiling increase applies to the following vendors:
  • W91QUZ-11-D-0005 - Exeter Information Technology Services, LLC
  • W91QUZ-11-D-0006 - Future Research Corporation
  • W91QUZ-11-D-0008 - Link Solutions, Inc.
  • W91QUZ-11-D-0009 - M-Cubed Information Systems
  • W91QUZ-11-D-0010 - Micro Technologies, LLC
  • W91QUZ-11-D-0013 - SNVC, L.C.
  • W91QUZ-11-D-0014 - Superlative Technologies, Inc.
  • W91QUZ-11-D-0015 - T4, LLC
  • W91QUZ-11-D-0021 - Tantus-OnPoint ATO Systems Support

The ceiling increase was driven by an increase in delivery orders over the past year. ITS-SB customers cite the contract’s no-fee, dedicated small business offerings as a key reason for increasing use of the vehicle.

About CHESS

Based at Fort Belvoir, VA., CHESS reports to the Program Executive Office, Enterprise Information Systems (PEO EIS). Charged by the CIO/G-6 and mandated through Army Regulation 25-1, CHESS is the Army-designated primary source for providing commercial hardware and software solutions for the Army's IT requirements. Offering simple, straightforward contract vehicles through its online Army e-commerce ordering system, the IT e-mart, CHESS directly supports the CIO/G-6 strategy by providing the benefits of continuous vendor competition for best value and consolidating requirements to maximize cost avoidance and leverage the Army's buying power. CHESS works diligently with other Army Knowledge Management partners, including the U.S. Army CIO/G-6, Information Systems Engineering Command, and Network Enterprise Technology Command to provide architecturally sound, standards-and-policy-compliant IT enterprise solutions to all Army customers around the world. For more information about CHESS, visit https://chess.army.mil/.

Posted April 06, 2017

MC4 Plays Integral Part in the U.S. Army’s Casualty Care System for Roles 1-3

By MC4 Strategic Communications Office

Fort Detrick, MD. - The Medical Communications for Combat Casualty Care (MC4) systems support Roles 1-3 of the U.S. Army’s modern health services support system covering the operational environment to the hospital facility. The U.S. Army supports the effective distribution of resources across facilities at various levels of command, across different locations, each with differing levels of capability. The goal for the U.S. Army is to provide the most efficient means to save the Soldier’s life and “ensure the stabilization and survivability of the patient through advanced trauma management and far-forward resuscitative surgery prior to movement between medical treatment facilities,” as stated in DoD’s fourth revision of Emergency War Surgery.

MC4 plays a key part in support of Roles 1-3 by integrating and fielding the Army capability to digitally capture medical treatment data, specifically the Soldiers’ electronic health record (EHR), in these dynamic operational environments. The EHR is accessible by the Soldier and his/her medical treatment providers throughout their military career and retirement, and eventually by Veterans Affairs (VA).

In support of the Soldier’s EHR in operational environments, MC4 enables the clinical documentation and management software application called AHLTA-Theater. The AHLTA-Theater application suite is available at all Roles (1-3) and includes access to Defense Medical Logistics Standard Support (DMLSS) Customer Assistance Module (DCAM), a logistical support tool for ordering medical supplies, access to medical references, the Medical Situational Awareness in the Theater (MSAT) which combines information to provide decision support and a common operating picture, the Theater Medical Data Store (TMDS) and DoD’s Clinical Data Repository (CDR).

The Roles 1-3 process begins when the patient moves from the point of injury (POI) into the care of specialized medical professionals trained in tactical combat casualty care, stabilizing surgical treatment and trauma management. Depending on the critical or urgent nature of the patients’ condition, it is possible to bypass a role in order to move to a higher level of capability that matches the needs of trauma management, resuscitative care and stabilization.

Point of Injury (POI):

Before Roles 1-3 even begins the actual start of the process occurs at the POI. At this early stage, first-aid care is provided by a combat medic, buddy or combat lifesaver (non-medical team or squad member trained in enhanced first-aid) in order to take immediate lifesaving measures to the injured Soldier.

Role 1: Role 1 is the battalion aid station where the patient is treated by a physician, physician assistant or medic. If necessary, after triage, treatment and stabilization, the Soldier either returns to duty or is evacuated to a role 2 or appropriate medical treatment facility (MTF). Treatment in Role 1 does not have to be combat related. Patients with non-battle injuries, disease, and behavioral and operational stress conditions can also be treated. Role 1 facilities do not have the capability for patient holding (inpatient type treatment).

MC4 provides systems support at the POI and Role 1 stages with Mobile Computing Capability (MCC) and AHLTA-Theater.

Role 2: Role 2 MTFs are brigade level support with levels of care that range from basic primary care to lifesaving emergency treatment. This role can provide advanced trauma management and emergency measures that go beyond Role 1. Role 2 provides an advanced level of capabilities than Role 1 which can include 72-hour patient hold, blood transfusions, x-ray, clinical labs, dental support, optometry services, physical therapy and combat operational stress control when augmented. A forward surgical team (FST) can be collocated with the medical company to provide resuscitative surgical care. The main assets that make up Role 2 are located in medical companies (brigade support battalion) assigned to armored, infantry and Stryker battalion combat teams and area support units that directly support divisions and echelons above brigade.

MC4 provides systems support at the Role 2 stage with AHLTA-Theater and DCAM.

Role 3: In Role 3, patients are treated at a non-mobile facility known as a Combat Support Hospital (CSH) that is equipped to provide care to all categories of patients: wound surgery, resuscitation, damage control surgery and postoperative treatment. The CSH provides inpatient (emergency room (ER), intensive care unit (ICU), operating room (OR), nursing care) and outpatient (pharmacy, psychiatry, public health nursing, physical therapy, clinical laboratory, blood banking, radiology and nutrition care services) capabilities. Patients who cannot survive movement over long distance are treated at a Role 3 CSH. The Role 3 CSH can support as many as 248 patients for up to six OR tables. Surgical specialties at a Role 3 CSH include general, orthopedic, thoracic, urological, gynecological, and oral and maxillofacial surgery.

MC4 provides systems support at the Role 3 level with AHLTA-Theater, which includes TC2 server and inpatient documentation.

Finally, it is important to note that MC4 systems indirectly support Role 4 hospitals as well. The TMDS cloud application transmits patient medical treatment information from the combat zone through theater levels of care (Roles 1-3). These theater levels of care and MTFs access and share patient data with hospitals and the VA (Role 4). In essence, MC4’s support of the lifelong digital record enables that Soldier’s EHR to be transmitted from the battlefront to the homefront.

Posted March 24, 2017